Tag Archives: Brome Squirrel Buster feeders

Bird Feeding Tips – Keeping “Undesirables” Out of the Feeders

We have an amazing assortment of birds who come to our backyard and porch feeders.  I keep a list going in my bird guide and to date we have seen over 30 species in our yard!  Unfortunately we also have a few four-legged, furry varmints who try to horn in on the goodies.  We’ve had good results with three different types of “squirrel proof” seed feeders.  As ever, my opinions are my own – I receive no compensation or perks for any of my product reviews.

  1. Woodlink Absolute II Squirrel Proof Feeder:  This big boy holds over a gallon of seed and is pretty much squirrel proof.  The perch bars are spring-loaded so anything heavier than a bird pressing on them lowers doors over the seed trays.  The occasional smartyboots realizes he can lay flat on top and streeeeetch down and around to get his paws on a few seeds.  But for the most part the tree rats are thwarted.  Deer however, are another problem.  They just stroll up and lick the seed out of the tray.  Deer don’t like walking through tall bushes or grasses (I guess they are afraid a predator could be hiding in there) so we situate the feeder in the midst of perennials they don’t like, and that cuts down considerably on deer feeding.
    We keep this big boy tucked in the perennial garden to keep birds fed and deer at bay

    We keep this big boy tucked in the perennial garden to keep birds fed and deer at bay – even on snowy winter days.

     

  2. Brome Squirrel Buster Classic:  This large hanging feeder is awesome!  It holds about 1.5 quarts of seed so we don’t need to refill it every day, it vents the seed tubes to keep the seed safe to eat, and the design keeps the vermin away.  The outer metal cage is spring-loaded so if anything heavier than a bird lands on it or hangs on one of the perches, the cage slides down and closes over the seed cups.  I’ve watched squirrels jump on it and boo hoo, no seed for you!
    With four staggered perches there's plenty of room for hungry babies to hang out and wait for Dad to rustle up some grub

    With four staggered perches there’s plenty of room for hungry babies to hang out and wait for Dad to rustle up some grub

    Let's not think too hard about what's actually going on here! #kindagross

    Let’s not think too hard about what’s actually going on here! #kindagross

  3. Brome Squirrel Buster Mini:  This is the first Brome feeder we bought and it also works great.  It too is spring-loaded so anything heavier than a bird drags down the outer cage and closes the seed cups.  The only drawback is its size – it only holds 3 cups of seed, so we were filling it daily, sometimes twice daily.
    Male Rose-Breasted Grosbeak

    Male Rose-Breasted Grosbeak

    House and Goldfinches share the feeder

    House and Goldfinches share the feeder

We also like to offer suet to the birds year ’round.  At first the squirrels and the resident ‘coon ate us out of house and home, but then we discovered suet made with Cayenne Pepper.  This kind costs a few cents more so shop around for the best price (our local Ace Hardware consistently has the best price, and sometimes I even catch a sale).  Mammals hate its spicy taste, but birds do not have any pain receptors for capsaicin (the chemical that makes peppers hot) so they couldn’t care less about it.

We soon discovered, however, another type of “undesirable” at the suet feeders:  birds that are not true suet eaters!  Finches, cowbirds, thrashers and others sat at the suet cakes and tore them apart to get at the seeds inside, scattering most of the suet on the ground.  We were going through 3 or 4 of these pricey suet cakes a week, so it was very annoying to see so much waste.

While we were at our local Ace stocking up on black sunflower seeds and suet cakes we spied a funky looking suet feeder, the Songbird Essentials Recycled Upside Down Suet Feeder.  As you can see this feeder is a little recycled plastic house with access to the suet only on the bottom.  We could not imagine how a bird was going to flip upside down mid flight to get at the suet, so we read some reviews and other users swore the birds quickly figure it out.  Indeed they do.  Only true suet eaters are capable of or “like” feeding upside down, so this feeder perfectly suits the birds you want at the suet feeder – woodpeckers, nuthatches, chickadees, wrens, bluebirds and the like.  As a bonus, the squirrels can’t get at it either, so we can forgo the extra expense of the hot pepper suet!  We are now going through about a third of the suet cakes we used to, so this baby paid for itself in about 3 weeks.  Win, win, win!  Here’s a few of the beauties who now have exclusive use of the suet feeder:

Female Downy Woodpecker

Female Downy Woodpecker

 

Male Downy Woodpecker

Male Downy Woodpecker

 

Baby Boy Downy Woodpecker - even the babies figured it out!

Baby Boy Downy Woodpecker – even the babies figured it out!

 

White-Breasted Nuthatch

White-Breasted Nuthatch

 

Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse

 

Black-Capped Chickadee

Black-Capped Chickadee

 

Carolina Wrens are my heroes. They are small but mighty, curious, industrious and they do things their own way. This guy was not injured - he was just having fun!

Carolina Wrens are my heroes. They are small but mighty, curious, industrious and they do things their own way. This guy was not injured – he was just having fun!  Like he was working on his Triangle Pose while grabbing a snack.  Don’t you just want to rub that fuzzy buff tummy?

 

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